Share 5 Books You Can Read in One Sitting

5 Books You Can Read in One Sitting

Stu Smith is a California native, raised on healthy doses of John Steinbeck and Jack London. When asked about his formative years, he is likely to respond “the only good things to ever come out of Sacramento were me and Joan Didion.”  Now a proud resident of New York City, he can be found on warm days lounging in Central Park with his dog on his lap and a manuscript in his hand.

Occasionally, I crave a book I can read in a day. There is a rush to it. I sometimes only get a single day all week to sit with a book and I feel like I want to see it through from beginning to end. Who knows what draws readers to the shorter, more condescended story? Maybe you are looking to fulfill a reading goal or perhaps you need a quick book club pick for a shorter month. Whatever your reasons, here are five recommendations for books you can certainly read in a day.


One of the Boys
by Daniel Magariel
You will finish this book in a day, but then you’ll spend a few weeks thinking about it. Daniel Magariel tells the story of a father, a 12-year-old boy, and his older brother—all navigating a new life in suburban New Mexico. After a bitter divorce and custody battle, the boys must reckon with their father’s abusive tendencies and master the art of survival. This is a book the New York Times Book Review called “Feral and tender... a gorgeously tight tale swelling with wisdom about the self-destructive longing for paternal approval and the devastating consequence of clinging to rotten models of masculinity.”
One of the Boys
Daniel Magariel

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5 Books You Can Read in One Sitting

By Stu Smith | May 28, 2018

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I'm Thinking of Ending Things
by Iain Reid
Have a sedative close by upon finishing this one. Iain Reid’s creepy and downright sinister debut novel is perfect if you need a Friday night at home on the couch with a completely distracting book to get your mind off of a long week. I’m not telling you that it will be relaxing, but I promise that you won’t be able to stop reading until the final reveal. When Jake takes his girlfriend home to meet his parents at a secluded farm, things start to seem a bit off. When he takes a sudden detour and they end up at an abandoned high school, things get seriously intense. Fans of Stephen King's MISERY and the film Get Out will find this one to be just their speed.

Read the full review of I'M THINKING OF ENDING THINGS.
I'm Thinking of Ending Things
Iain Reid

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5 Books You Can Read in One Sitting

By Stu Smith | May 28, 2018

This Book Will Chill You to the Bone, But You Won’t Know Why

By Nikki Barnhart | April 4, 2018

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Gwendy's Button Box
by Stephen King and Richard Chizmar
Stephen King is no stranger to the short story and is often varied in his breadth of storytelling. In GWENDY’S BUTTON BOX, King pairs up with Richard Chizmar to revisit the mysterious town of Castle Rock. When 12-year-old Gwendy comes across a familiar King character in a black bowler hat (who fans might remember from the Dark Tower series), a series of events take place that readers will never forget. Finally, King is telling the story of one of his most intriguing and elusive characters.
Gwendy's Button Box
Stephen King and Richard Chizmar

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Writing to Save a Life
by John Edgar Wideman
Part research and part memoir, John Edgar Wideman seeks out the story of the father of Emmett Till. Emmett became a symbol in the Civil Rights Movement when his mother chose to leave his casket open to show what white men had done to her son. Wideman was also a 14-year-old boy at the time of Till’s death and the story always intrigued him. When he found out through his research that Louis Till, Emmett’s father, had been executed by the Army ten years earlier for rape and murder, he couldn’t help but see the similarities in the two fates. Wideman’s work tells an important story that has been too long buried.

Read the full review of WRITING TO SAVE A LIFE.
Writing to Save a Life
John Edgar Wideman

In 1955, Emmett Till was brutally murdered for allegedly whistling at a white woman. Ten years earlier, Emmett’s father, an iconic Civil Rights martyr, was executed by the Army for rape and murder. In WRITING TO SAVE A LIFE, John Edgar Wideman searches for Louis Till, a silent victim of American injustice. An evocative and personal exploration of individual and collective memory in America by one of the most formidable intellectuals of our time.

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The Last Black Unicorn
by Tiffany Haddish
Tiffany Haddish is blowing up everywhere in entertainment right now. But you may want to sit down and take a look at where she is from. With incredible heart, humility, and humor, Haddish recalls a troubled childhood, teenage homelessness, and growing up in the foster care system in California. There are some deeply troubling stories told with incredible humor and tenacity. You will find yourself discussing this one with all sorts of people to make them laugh, to make them think, and to tell them that, in this book, you learned that truly anything is possible—even unicorns.
The Last Black Unicorn
Tiffany Haddish

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