It’s Our Birthday and You Get the Presents!

This month, we’re celebrating the second birthday of Off the Shelf! We love sharing great books with great readers. To celebrate two years of amazing recommendations, we’ve excerpted some of our favorite reviews below. You can’t go wrong with any of these books. And we are giving away all of them! Enter below for your chance to win.

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A Man Called Ove
by Fredrik Backman

“If you like to laugh AND feel moved AND have your heart applaud wildly for fictional characters, you will certainly fall for the grumpy but lovable Ove (it’s pronounced “Oo-vuh,” if you were wondering).”  

Read Ariele Stewart’s review here.

About Grace
by Anthony Doerr

“From midpoint on, this extraordinary novel is about Grace—about finding Grace. In every way.”

Read Betsy Burton’s review here.

The Opposite of Loneliness
by Marina Keegan

“A collection of short fiction and personal essays, THE OPPOSITE OF LONELINESS reads like your early twenties in real time, touching on friendship, love, jealousy, self-discovery, family, and the one thing you’ll always love, no matter what: your first car.”

Read Julianna Haubner’s review here.

Hyperbole and a Half
by Allie Brosh

“I have read very few books in my life that compelled me to laugh so loudly in public that it made the people around me visibly uncomfortable. Allie Brosh’s HYPERBOLE AND A HALF is one of them.”

Read Sarah Jane Abbott’s review here.

Gone to Soldiers
by Marge Piercy

“More than 750 pages long, GONE TO SOLDIERS can definitely be intimidating, and I knew when I picked up this novel that it would need to be extraordinary in order to hold my attention for a few weeks. Thankfully, I was not disappointed.”

Read Erin Flaaen’s review here.

They Marched Into Sunlight
by David Maraniss

“The cast of characters is vast, and this warmly peopled book owes a portion of its grandeur to Maraniss’s empathic gift for giving them new life. As a result the book has a beating pulse and a heart that reveals itself as vulnerable yet stout.”

Read Stuart Roberts’s review here.

The Rosie Project
by Graeme Simsion

“THE ROSIE PROJECT is a novel for people who love romantic comedy, but also for people (like me) who don’t think they like romance and are looking for something funny and relatable.”

Read Sarah Jane Abbott’s review here.

The Light Between Oceans
by M. L. Stedman

“The world is full of decent people making disastrous decisions. I love a book that can find the beauty in that.”

Read Susan Crandall’s review here.

I Am Pilgrim
by Terry Hayes

“For me, I AM PILGRIM was a game changer. It raised the bar for international spy thrillers and became the benchmark for all future reads. It’s rich in detail and character, full of heart-racing action, and terrifying in its plausibility. It has heart and has you questioning your own beliefs.”

Read David Brown’s review here.

On Writing
by Stephen King

“Nothing I have ever read about the writing life has moved or inspired me more. Whether or not you are a King fan, whether you are a professional writer or have never written a word, this is essential reading on the art of writing and the art of life.”

Where Are the Children?
by Mary Higgins Clark

“My grandmother read every one of Clark’s novels, but I could see why she kept WHERE ARE THE CHILDREN? It is classic spine-tingling suspense; even David Foster Wallace kept a copy in his personal library and taught it in fiction classes at Illinois State University.”

Read Elizabeth Breeden’s review here.

The House of the Spirits
by Isabel Allende

“It was an enormous pleasure for me to reread this book three decades after it first made its mark on me. I found myself still enraptured by the words of these women, still dazzled by the magic potion that is Isabel Allende’s gift for storytelling. And as I reached the final page, I smiled in wonderment at the forces that led me to where I am today, and was thankful for the reminder that our future is written in the stars.”

Read Johanna Castillo’s review here.