Share Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

Caitlin Kleinschmidt is part of the sales team at Workman Publishing. She has previously held positions at Viking/Riverhead, Simon & Schuster, Oxford University Press, and Macmillan. A Navy brat, she lived on both coasts and credits the Dear America series for her lifelong love of history. She has a special place in her heart for narrative nonfiction, as well as books about Eastern Europe and ballet.

Every serious reader dreads being caught in a lobby or on a train with nothing to read. When Jonathan Safran Foer experienced this mind-numbing, soul-crushing boredom while munching on a Chipotle burrito, he had a revelation. Wondering why there was nothing to read on his cup, he emailed Chipotle’s CEO, and “Cultivating Thought” was born. An author series curated by Safran Foer, it features original and thought-provoking text by a diverse selection of writers printed on Chipotle’s beverage cups and to-go bags. A wonderfully whimsical democratization of literature, “Cultivating Thought” brings the musings of George Saunders, Toni Morrison, and more to a whole new audience. However, if you want to discover their writings beyond what’s printed on a Chipotle cup, here are the books to pick up.


Tenth of December: Stories
by George Saunders

A National Book Award finalist and one of the New York Times ten best books of 2013, Tenth of December is an honest and moving story collection from an undisputed master of the form. Writing brilliantly and profoundly about class, sex, love, loss, work, despair, and war, George Saunders cuts to the core of the contemporary experience. Unsettling, insightful, and hilarious, these stories take on the big questions and explore the fault lines of our own morality, delving into what it is that makes us good and what makes us human.

Tenth of December: Stories
George Saunders

A National Book Award finalist and one of the New York Times ten best books of 2013, Tenth of December is an honest and moving story collection from an undisputed master of the form. Writing brilliantly and profoundly about class, sex, love, loss, work, despair, and war, George Saunders cuts to the core of the contemporary experience. Unsettling, insightful, and hilarious, these stories take on the big questions and explore the fault lines of our own morality, delving into what it is that makes us good and what makes us human.

MENTIONED IN:

Short Stories to Obsess Over

By Erin Flaaen | August 12, 2015

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | March 12, 2015

Close

Flash Boys
by Michael Lewis

When a small group of Wall Street guys figure out that the US stock market has been rigged for the benefit of insiders and is controlled by the big Wall Street banks, they band together and set out to reform the financial markets. The Flash Boys have somehow preserved a moral sense in an environment where you don’t get paid for that—and are willing to go to war against institutionalized injustice.

Flash Boys
Michael Lewis

When a small group of Wall Street guys figure out that the US stock market has been rigged for the benefit of insiders and is controlled by the big Wall Street banks, they band together and set out to reform the financial markets. The Flash Boys have somehow preserved a moral sense in an environment where you don’t get paid for that—and are willing to go to war against institutionalized injustice.

MENTIONED IN:

14 Boy Books for Long Summer Days

By Sarah Jane Abbott | August 2, 2016

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | March 12, 2015

Close

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking
by Malcolm Gladwell

Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in the blink of an eye. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others stumble into error? Why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Blink reveals that great decision makers aren’t those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking
Malcolm Gladwell

Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in the blink of an eye. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others stumble into error? Why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Blink reveals that great decision makers aren’t those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

MENTIONED IN:

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | March 12, 2015

Close

Everything is Illuminated
by Jonathan Safran Foer

The highly distinguished mastermind behind Chipotle’s literary cups, Jonathan Safran Foer emerged as one of the most original writers of his generation with his debut novel, Everything Is Illuminated. With only a yellowing photograph in hand, a young man—also named Jonathan Safran Foer—sets out to find the woman who may or may not have saved his grandfather from the Nazis. Accompanied by an old man haunted by memories of World War II, an amorous dog, and a Ukrainian translator who habitually butchers the English language, Jonathan is led on a quixotic journey over a devastated landscape and into an unexpected past.

Everything is Illuminated
Jonathan Safran Foer

The highly distinguished mastermind behind Chipotle’s literary cups, Jonathan Safran Foer emerged as one of the most original writers of his generation with his debut novel, Everything Is Illuminated. With only a yellowing photograph in hand, a young man—also named Jonathan Safran Foer—sets out to find the woman who may or may not have saved his grandfather from the Nazis. Accompanied by an old man haunted by memories of World War II, an amorous dog, and a Ukrainian translator who habitually butchers the English language, Jonathan is led on a quixotic journey over a devastated landscape and into an unexpected past.

MENTIONED IN:

13 Smart Books from @HotDudesReading’s Instagram

By Erica Nelson | August 23, 2016

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | March 12, 2015

Close

Running With Scissors
by Augusten Burroughs
When Augusten Burroughs’s mother gave him away to be raised by her unorthodox psychiatrist, he found himself living in a bizarre situation. Residing in a dilapidated Victorian home with a pedophile in the backyard shed, there were no rules and no school. Valium was consumed like candy and when things got dull, there was always the vintage electroshock therapy machine under the stairs. By turns foul and harrowing, this compelling and maniacally funny memoir chronicles an ordinary boy’s survival under the most extraordinary circumstances.
Running With Scissors
Augusten Burroughs

Running with Scissors is the true story of a boy whose mother (a poet with delusions of Anne Sexton) gave him away to be raised by her unorthodox psychiatrist who bore a striking resemblance to Santa Claus. So at the age of twelve, Burroughs found himself amidst Victorian squalor living with the doctor’s bizarre family, and befriending a pedophile who resided in the backyard shed. The story of an outlaw childhood where rules were unheard of, and the Christmas tree stayed up all year round, where Valium was consumed like candy, and if things got dull an electroshock- therapy machine could provide entertainment. The funny, harrowing and bestselling account of an ordinary boy’s survival under the most extraordinary circumstances.

MENTIONED IN:

13 Timely Books to Read During Banned Books Week

By Sarah Jane Abbott | September 25, 2017

A Childhood Memoir That’s Stranger Than Fiction

By Hilary Krutt | March 4, 2016

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | March 12, 2015

Love the Madness: 7 Essential Books Starring Dysfunctional Families

By Off the Shelf Staff | November 25, 2014

No Wire Hangers EVER! 8 Books With The Dearest, Scariest Mommies EVER!

By Off the Shelf Staff | October 14, 2014

Close

How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
by Julia Alvarez

This brilliant, buoyant, and beloved novel gives voice to four sisters growing up in two cultures. The García family fled the Dominican Republic for New York City in 1960 when their father’s role in an attempted coup was discovered. In the wild and wondrous and not always welcoming USA, their parents try to hold on to their old ways, but the girls try to find new lives: forgetting their Spanish, straightening their hair, and wearing bell bottoms. How the García Girls Lost Their Accents captures how it is both liberating and excruciating to navigate the old world and the new.

How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
Julia Alvarez

This brilliant, buoyant, and beloved novel gives voice to four sisters growing up in two cultures. The García family fled the Dominican Republic for New York City in 1960 when their father’s role in an attempted coup was discovered. In the wild and wondrous and not always welcoming USA, their parents try to hold on to their old ways, but the girls try to find new lives: forgetting their Spanish, straightening their hair, and wearing bell bottoms. How the García Girls Lost Their Accents captures how it is both liberating and excruciating to navigate the old world and the new.

MENTIONED IN:

Coming to America: 13 Immigrant Stories That Represent Our History

By Julianna Haubner | March 2, 2017

11 Novels that Explore the Beautiful and Complex Bonds of Sisterhood

By Hilary Krutt | June 23, 2015

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | March 12, 2015

A Woman’s Guide to Latin America in 7 Books

By Off the Shelf Staff | November 11, 2014

Close

The Alchemist
by Paolo Coelho

Paulo Coelho’s universally admired masterpiece tells the story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure. The story of the treasures Santiago finds along the way teaches us, as only a few stories can, about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, learning to read the omens strewn along life’s path, and, above all, following our dreams. With more than two million copies sold around the world, The Alchemist continues to change the lives of readers forever.

The Alchemist
Paolo Coelho

Paulo Coelho’s universally admired masterpiece tells the story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure. The story of the treasures Santiago finds along the way teaches us, as only a few stories can, about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, learning to read the omens strewn along life’s path, and, above all, following our dreams. With more than two million copies sold around the world, The Alchemist continues to change the lives of readers forever.

MENTIONED IN:

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | March 12, 2015

Close

The Poisonwood Bible
by Barbara Kingsolver
Told by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, a fierce, evangelical Baptist preacher who moves his family to the Belgian Congo in 1959, this engrossing epic is the story of one family’s tragic undoing and remarkable reconstruction over the course of three decades in postcolonial Africa. Taking its place alongside the classic works of postcolonial literature, this ambitious novel established Barbara Kingsolver as one of the most thoughtful and daring of modern writers.
The Poisonwood Bible
Barbara Kingsolver

This family epic set in the Belgian Congo in 1959 is narrated by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, an evangelical Baptist missionary. Told over the course of three decades in postcolonial Africa, it is the story of one family and one nation’s tragic undoing.

MENTIONED IN:

13 Fantastic Books Sure to Get Your Book Club Talking

By Erica Nelson | June 16, 2016

14 Must-Read Books Set Under the African Sun

By Emma Volk | January 12, 2016

10 Cross-Cultural Novels that Illuminate the World We Live In

By Tolani Osan | September 24, 2015

11 Novels that Explore the Beautiful and Complex Bonds of Sisterhood

By Hilary Krutt | June 23, 2015

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | March 12, 2015

Close

Steve Jobs
by Walter Isaacson

This adaptation of Walter Isaacson's phenomenal bestseller stars Kate Winslet, Seth Rogan, Jeff Daniels, and, most importantly, Michael Fassbender as the enigmatic and divisive Apple co-founder who revolutionized life in the digital age.

Release Date: October 9, 2015

Steve Jobs
Walter Isaacson

This adaptation of Walter Isaacson's phenomenal bestseller stars Kate Winslet, Seth Rogan, Jeff Daniels, and, most importantly, Michael Fassbender as the enigmatic and divisive Apple co-founder who revolutionized life in the digital age.

Release Date: October 9, 2015

MENTIONED IN:

13 Books You’ll Want to Read Before They Hit the Big Screen

By Emma Volk | July 14, 2015

Chipotle’s Literary Salon: The Books Behind the Burritos

By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | March 12, 2015

Close

Thank you for joining our email list!

If you create and Off the Shelf account, you'll be able to save books to your personal bookshelf, and be eligible for free books and other good stuff.

Click here to create your free account.

You must be logged in to add books to your shelf.

Please log in or sign up now.